Showing posts with label Drinking water. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Drinking water. Show all posts

Dec 15, 2014

Teaching Kids to Survive

"Prepping isn’t about talking… It’s about doing. It’s about learning."

Turning Your Child into a Survivor


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As preppers and modern survivalists we’re all concerned about what we can do to ensure that we can survive any disaster, weather any storm and being ready for all of the SHTF moments and scenarios life can throw at us. I think it’s important sometimes to take a step back from this stuff and remember the big picture. It doesn’t really matter how prepared you are, how much food you have stockpiled or how many guns and bullets you have. One day you will die.


It’s kind of dark and even depressing to think about but it’s important to remember. We are all finite beings. There is no prep out there that will keep the grim reaper away indefinitely. With this in mind, we need to start looking at things that we can do now to prepare for that reality. Who are you going to leave behind? You might be prepared for anything, but what about your children? Have you instilled a prepper mindset into your kids? Are they ready to face a of life’s disasters head on and thrive?

How to talk to your kids about prepping
It’s hard enough to talk to adults about the importance of prepping. Most people simply aren’t ready for their illusion of modern society to be broken. Teaching children about prepping can sometimes be even harder. Most kids are blissfully unaware of the realities of the world around them. And yes, while it is our job as parents to protect them and take care of the big stuff for them, we’re not going to be around forever…and in a SHTF disaster scenario, the chances that you may not actually be one of the survivors, despite your preparations is higher than most of us are willing to admit.
So with that in mind, what can we do now to start teaching our kids about preparedness? You don’t need to have the “prepper talk” with your kids. They’re unlikely to understand it, they’ll probably be ridiculed by their peers as soon as word gets out that Jimmy or Sally is a “doomsday prepper” and in reality you don’t need to have that talk.
Prepping isn’t about talking… It’s about doing. It’s about learning.

Teach your kids basic survival skills – The basic skills our grandparents and their grandparents used on a daily basis are sadly becoming extinct thanks to modern conveniences. We need to teach our children these basic survival skills so that they can be ready if the time comes to use them.

  • How to build a fire without matches
  • How to hunt
  • How to  tie basic knots
  • How to purify water
  • How to cook without power and running water
  • How to make a shelter
  • How to do basic first aid on themselves and others
  • How to defend themselves

Teach your kids how fragile their world really is – Most children today have really no idea how fragile things like our food supply, governments and economy are. If we don’t teach them about these things no one will. Teach them about…
  • The real meaning of money – how it’s made, what money really is, why the economy is in the state it’s in.
  • Liberty – Why this country was founded, the principles it was founded on and why no man/women should be a slave to anyone, including their government
  • Financial responsibility – Teach them about saving money, insurance, how debt works and how it really is cancer.
  • Work Ethic – How there’s really no such thing a free lunch and that it’s their job to work for the things they want in life.
  • Food and water storage – Explain the real reasons why you store food and water. Not because the zombies or pandemics are coming, but because stored food is insurance. It’s an investment in your future survival no matter what kind of disaster you might face.

Today’s children have a tough road ahead of them. Even if the big SHTF disaster never comes, they’re likely to face continued economic troubles, oppressive governments and they’ll continue to be inundated with the unsustainable ideals from the “entitlement” generations and THEIR kids. They’ll face adults who think it’s their job to undo the lessons of self-reliance you’ve instilled in them. They’ll also face all the same day to day disaster threats that we all do like personal security and financial security. There may come a time that (god forbid) they will need to rely on basic survival skills to get them out of a serious jam.
It’s our responsibility as parents to not only prepare ourselves for disaster but to prepare our children as well. Far too many parents of years past failed in their parental responsibilities and have created a convenience-centered, fragile society in the hopes of sheltering their kids from the world around them. Well… take a look around. Take a look at all the modern disaster threats we face today whether people want to admit to them or not and how blissfully unprepared most of the world is. How’d that work out? Not well would be my answer.
We need to break that cycle of what I’m calling “ignorance-education”. We need to teach our children that the world isn’t perfect, that they’re not entitled to whatever they want without working for it and we need to teach them to pass on these lessons to future generations so that one day we can hopefully re-educate our society and reclaim the liberty and responsibility that this country was founded on.

great Prepper content at Source:  http://ready4itall.org/turning-your-child-into-a-prepper/

Jan 21, 2014

Easy to build, Conserve rainwater


Easy to build, 
Conserve rainwater from plastic drums, barrels or trash cans.

Search online for “bottles” or “containers” to find an “open head” plastic 55-gallon drum with a cover (about $60). Or find a used barrel by talking to car wash managers (they buy soap and wax by the barrel). If you can't find a container you like, buy a large, heavy-duty garbage can (about $35) at a home center. All the other plumbing parts will add up to about $40.
Place the drum near a downspout, drill a hole in the side near the bottom and screw in a drain valve. That's an OK installation if you plan to run a soaker hose to your garden. But if you want to use a wand or a spray nozzle, you'll need to elevate the barrel on a stand for more water pressure.  
CAUTION! Water is heavy (1 Barrel-55 gallons weighs 440 lbs.), 
so use 4x4 treated lumber for the legs and secure everything with construction screws or stainless steel lags. But don't place the stand on soft ground. You could kill somebody if the rig toppled over.
Close-up of conduit adapters


If you have large gardens and want to store more water, double-size the stand and add a second barrel.
Cut holes in the bottoms of the barrels with a 2-1/4-in. hole saw. Then screw in a 2-in. male threaded electrical (gray PVC) conduit adapter (electrical adapters aren't tapered like plumbing adapters, so you can tighten them down all the way). Squirt a thin bead of silicone caulk around the opening and screw on a threaded electrical PVC coupler to cinch the barrel between the two fittings (see Figure A). Next, glue together sections of 2-in. PVC pipe, unions (to make winter disassembly easier), reducers and valves. As long as you're at it, install an overflow pipe so you can direct the excess where you want it.
Finally, cut a hole in one of the covers and mount a screen to filter out leaves and debris. Then just wait for the next big rain.

 http://www.familyhandyman.com/smart-homeowner/how-to-build-a-rain-barrel/

Conserve rainwater

   
Conserve water by collecting rainwater and using it for your garden or lawn.
WHAT YOU’LL NEED
  • Recycled food barrel (try checking with large restaurants or food distributors)
  • 2 to 4 concrete blocks (to allow room for a bucket to fit under the spigot)
  • 3/4-inch hose spigot
  • Drill
  • Saber saw
  • 3/4 x 1-1/4-inch threaded pipe nipple (used as overflow connector)
  • Window screen
  • PVC cement                                               
  •                                                                 WHAT YOU’LL DO
rainbarrel-200x200  
1. Wash out the barrel with a solution of 1/8-cup bleach and 5 gallons of water.
2. Drill a 15/16-inch hole a few inches from the bottom of the barrel.
Thread the spigot halfway into the barrel, apply PVC cement onto the
threads and continue screwing it in until snug.
3. Using the same procedure as the spigot, install the 3/4-inch overflow
connector a few inches from the top of the barrel.
4. Choose a good spot for the rain barrel. It needs to be close to a rain
downspout and a short distance from your plants and gardens.
5. Raise the barrel off the ground by placing it on concrete blocks.
Reconfigure the downspout so it empties directly into the barrel.
Use the screen to cover the open hole in the barrel to prevent insects
or debris from getting in.
6. If you’ve installed an overflow, you can attach a hose and direct
the water to another part of your yard.
                                                                             


http://boyslife.org/hobbies-projects/projects/7544/build-a-rain-barrel/