Showing posts with label Fire and Security. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fire and Security. Show all posts

Dec 15, 2014

Teaching Kids to Survive

"Prepping isn’t about talking… It’s about doing. It’s about learning."

Turning Your Child into a Survivor


Untitled
As preppers and modern survivalists we’re all concerned about what we can do to ensure that we can survive any disaster, weather any storm and being ready for all of the SHTF moments and scenarios life can throw at us. I think it’s important sometimes to take a step back from this stuff and remember the big picture. It doesn’t really matter how prepared you are, how much food you have stockpiled or how many guns and bullets you have. One day you will die.


It’s kind of dark and even depressing to think about but it’s important to remember. We are all finite beings. There is no prep out there that will keep the grim reaper away indefinitely. With this in mind, we need to start looking at things that we can do now to prepare for that reality. Who are you going to leave behind? You might be prepared for anything, but what about your children? Have you instilled a prepper mindset into your kids? Are they ready to face a of life’s disasters head on and thrive?

How to talk to your kids about prepping
It’s hard enough to talk to adults about the importance of prepping. Most people simply aren’t ready for their illusion of modern society to be broken. Teaching children about prepping can sometimes be even harder. Most kids are blissfully unaware of the realities of the world around them. And yes, while it is our job as parents to protect them and take care of the big stuff for them, we’re not going to be around forever…and in a SHTF disaster scenario, the chances that you may not actually be one of the survivors, despite your preparations is higher than most of us are willing to admit.
So with that in mind, what can we do now to start teaching our kids about preparedness? You don’t need to have the “prepper talk” with your kids. They’re unlikely to understand it, they’ll probably be ridiculed by their peers as soon as word gets out that Jimmy or Sally is a “doomsday prepper” and in reality you don’t need to have that talk.
Prepping isn’t about talking… It’s about doing. It’s about learning.

Teach your kids basic survival skills – The basic skills our grandparents and their grandparents used on a daily basis are sadly becoming extinct thanks to modern conveniences. We need to teach our children these basic survival skills so that they can be ready if the time comes to use them.

  • How to build a fire without matches
  • How to hunt
  • How to  tie basic knots
  • How to purify water
  • How to cook without power and running water
  • How to make a shelter
  • How to do basic first aid on themselves and others
  • How to defend themselves

Teach your kids how fragile their world really is – Most children today have really no idea how fragile things like our food supply, governments and economy are. If we don’t teach them about these things no one will. Teach them about…
  • The real meaning of money – how it’s made, what money really is, why the economy is in the state it’s in.
  • Liberty – Why this country was founded, the principles it was founded on and why no man/women should be a slave to anyone, including their government
  • Financial responsibility – Teach them about saving money, insurance, how debt works and how it really is cancer.
  • Work Ethic – How there’s really no such thing a free lunch and that it’s their job to work for the things they want in life.
  • Food and water storage – Explain the real reasons why you store food and water. Not because the zombies or pandemics are coming, but because stored food is insurance. It’s an investment in your future survival no matter what kind of disaster you might face.

Today’s children have a tough road ahead of them. Even if the big SHTF disaster never comes, they’re likely to face continued economic troubles, oppressive governments and they’ll continue to be inundated with the unsustainable ideals from the “entitlement” generations and THEIR kids. They’ll face adults who think it’s their job to undo the lessons of self-reliance you’ve instilled in them. They’ll also face all the same day to day disaster threats that we all do like personal security and financial security. There may come a time that (god forbid) they will need to rely on basic survival skills to get them out of a serious jam.
It’s our responsibility as parents to not only prepare ourselves for disaster but to prepare our children as well. Far too many parents of years past failed in their parental responsibilities and have created a convenience-centered, fragile society in the hopes of sheltering their kids from the world around them. Well… take a look around. Take a look at all the modern disaster threats we face today whether people want to admit to them or not and how blissfully unprepared most of the world is. How’d that work out? Not well would be my answer.
We need to break that cycle of what I’m calling “ignorance-education”. We need to teach our children that the world isn’t perfect, that they’re not entitled to whatever they want without working for it and we need to teach them to pass on these lessons to future generations so that one day we can hopefully re-educate our society and reclaim the liberty and responsibility that this country was founded on.

great Prepper content at Source:  http://ready4itall.org/turning-your-child-into-a-prepper/

Oct 28, 2013

Informational Lectures on Emergency/Disaster Planning and Response

Disaster Classification



Universities in the Eastern Africa Region have come together to implement an initiative Health Emergency Management Program (HEMP) that will build the capacity of local governments in the region to manage and plan for response to major disasters of public health importance. The Eastern African Region is prone to many natural and technological disasters of different kinds. There is not one nation in the region that is not vulnerable to the devastating effects of these disasters. Many of these disasters have a public health significance either directly in the case of epidemics of infectious diseases, or indirectly as a result of the breakdown of infrastructure associated with these disasters. The purpose of this initiative therefore is to increase the capacity of districts to plan for response, mitigation and preparedness for disasters, so as to reduce human suffering, morbidity and mortality that often arise from such incidents.
The success and implementation of this program in the region has been made possible by the funding from USAID



Continuation of previous video.


Continuation of first two videos.

Universities in the Eastern Africa Region have come together to implement an initiative Health Emergency Management Program (HEMP) that will build the capacity of local governments in the region to manage and plan for response to major disasters of public health importance. The Eastern African Region is prone to many natural and technological disasters of different kinds. There is not one nation in the region that is not vulnerable to the devastating effects of these disasters. Many of these disasters have a public health significance either directly in the case of epidemics of infectious diseases, or indirectly as a result of the breakdown of infrastructure associated with these disasters. The purpose of this initiative therefore is to increase the capacity of districts to plan for response, mitigation and preparedness for disasters, so as to reduce human suffering, morbidity and mortality that often arise from such incidents.
The success and implementation of this program in the region has been made possible by the funding from USAID



Public lecture video (2.17.2012): Planning and Preparing for the Local

 

When disaster strikes, the first responders are local...local officials, local police & fire departments, local doctors and nurses, local businesses, local volunteers. How can these people prepare for the disaster that might someday strike their community? Based on his 28 years of experience working on Crisis Management for FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), where he helped to plan for and respond to disasters such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, and terrorist incidents, Leo Bosner will offer a lecture on how local communities can strengthen their ability to respond quickly and effectively to the large disaster. Topics covered will include:
• Why local planning is important.
• The essential concept of the All-Hazards Disaster Response Plan.
• A typical format for a disaster response plan.
• How to create the disaster response plan.
• The disaster response exercise.


2011 Smithtown Emergency Preparedness Seminar @ Nesconset FD

 

 


Disaster Preparedness: Influenza and Emerging Infections

You can't watch TV these days without hearing about the threat of diseases like swine flu, bird flu or other emerging infections. With so much conflicting information in the media, it's hard to discern the facts about these pandemics and how we can best protect ourselves. Join Dr. John Blossom and infectious disease specialist Dr. Christian Sandrock as they talk with disaster response experts about how to recognize, report and respond to these pandemics, and lessons learned from previous experiences.


I do NOT own or have a copyright on these videos and they belong to the respective parties that made them. Taken from www.youtube.com

Disaster Preparedness Planning for Your Business


Businesses can do much to prepare for the impact of the many hazards they face in today’s world including natural hazards like floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes and widespread serious illness such as the H1N1 flu virus pandemic. Human-caused hazards include accidents, acts of violence by people and acts of terrorism. Examples of technology-related hazards are the failure or malfunction of systems, equipment or software.
Ready Business will assist businesses in developing a preparedness program by providing tools to create a plan that addresses the impact of many hazards. This website and its tools utilize an “all hazards approach” and follows the program elements within National Fire Protection Association 1600, Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs. NFPA 1600 is an American National Standard and has been adopted by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
The five steps in developing a preparedness program are:
  • Program Management
    • Organize, develop and administer your preparedness program
    • Identify regulations that establish minimum requirements for your program
  • Planning
    • Gather information about hazards and assess risks 
    • Conduct a business impact analysis (BIA)
    • Examine ways to prevent hazards and reduce risks
  • Implementation
    Write a preparedness plan addressing:
    • Resource management
    • Emergency response
    • Crisis communications
    • Business continuity
    • Information technology
    • Employee assistance
    • Incident management
    • Training
  • Testing and Exercises
    • Test and evaluate your plan
    • Define different types of exercises
    • Learn how to conduct exercises
    • Use exercise results to evaluate the effectiveness of the plan
  • Program Improvement
    • Identify when the preparedness program needs to be reviewed
    • Discover methods to evaluate the preparedness program
    • Utilize the review to make necessary changes and plan improvements
This article was taken from Ready/FEMA and further information can be found at http://www.ready.gov/business.